The 14th International Workshop on Java Technologies for Real-Time and Embedded Systems - JTRES 2016

Part of the

Managed Languages & Runtimes Week 2016

Aug. 29 - Sept. 2, 2016
Lugano, Switzerland

Lugano Image


Over 90% of all microprocessors are now used for real-time and embedded applications. Embedded devices are deployed on a broad diversity of distinct processor architectures and operating systems. The application software for many embedded devices is custom tailored if not written entirely from scratch. The size of typical embedded system software applications is growing exponentially from year to year, with many of today's embedded systems comprised of multiple millions of lines of code. For all of these reasons, the software portability, reuse, and modular composability benefits offered by Java are especially valuable to developers of embedded systems.

Both embedded and general purpose software frequently need to comply with real-time constraints. Higher-level programming languages and middleware are needed to robustly and productively design, implement, compose, integrate, validate, and enforce memory and real-time constraints along with conventional functional requirements for reusable software components. The Java programming language has become an attractive choice because of its safety, productivity, its relatively low maintenance costs, and the availability of well trained developers.


Interest in real-time Java by both the academic research community and commercial industry has been motivated by the need to manage the complexity and costs associated with continually expanding embedded real-time software systems. The goal of the workshop is to gather researchers working on real-time and embedded Java to identify the challenging problems that still need to be solved in order to assure the success of real-time Java as a technology and to report results and experience gained by researchers.

The Java ecosystem has outgrown the combination of Java as programming language and the JVM. For example, Android uses Java as source language and the Dalvik virtual machine for execution. Languages such as Scala are compiled to Java bytecode and executed on the JVM. JTRES welcomes submissions that apply such approaches to embedded and/or real-time systems.